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Physiotherapy Osteopathy Chiropractic Difference

Osteopathy and chiropractic

Physiotherapy; osteopathy; chiropractic -What’s the difference between them? Which physical therapy is it? Low down:
1. NHS – Osteopathy and chiropractic aren’t available on the NHS in all parts of the UK. Even in places where osteopathy is available, there may be limited availability. The same applies for Chiropractic treatment.


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Osteopathy and Physiotherapy

Many physiotherapists work as part of a multi-disciplinary team. They can work from NHS hospitals, community based organisations, private hospitals and clinics, sports clubs, charities and workplaces. Physiotherapists and osteopaths and chiropractors all use manual therapy or physical therapy.
That’s to say, we all use touch, to varying degrees. The skill of an Osteopath is high in palpation. The physiotherapist generally uses ultrasound, acupuncture, taping and creams and so on more so than the osteopath and chiropractor. Much hands on treatment technique differs somewhat. Manipulation or adjustment techniques used by the chiropractor, physiotherapist and osteopath – HVT or HVLAT – High velocity, low amplitude thrust techniques – are unique to the profession.

2. Qualifications – physiotherapy osteopathy chiropractic difference

Osteopaths complete a four – or five-year honours degree programme (bachelor’s or master’s), which involves at least 1,000 hours of clinical training. Some osteopaths are qualified to PhD level.
Chiropractors’ 4-year Chiropractic Degree programme ensures completion of bachelor of human science degree completion.
Physiotherapists complete a three-year full-time BSc (Hons ) programme.

Physiotherapy osteopathy chiropractic difference

3. NICE Guidelines – physiotherapy osteopathy chiropractic difference

There’s good evidence that osteopathy is effective for the treatment of persistent lower back pain. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends it as a treatment for this condition.

Currently, (NICE) recommends manual therapy that might include spinal manipulation (as practiced by chiropractors) as a treatment option for persistent lower back pain.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) advises that manual therapy can be used to treat persistent low back pain.

4. Legal – Primary Certifying Body – physiotherapy osteopathy chiropractic difference

It is illegal to practice osteopathy in the UK unless registered with General Osteopathic Council; to practice chiropractic in the UK unless registered General Chiropractic Council; physiotherapy unless registered with the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy.


Fast Facts

5.  Osteopathy is one of only two complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) that are regulated under UK law. The other is chiropractic.     Tweet This


 

6. Chiropractic was founded as a health profession in the US in 1895 by a Canadian called Daniel David Palmer, who practiced magnetic healing and who had no conventional medical training.

7. The earliest documented origins of physiotherapy (physical therapy) as a professional group date back to Per Henrik Ling, “Father of Swedish Gymnastics,” who founded the Royal Central Institute of Gymnastics (RCIG) in 1813 for massage, manipulation, and exercise. In1894 four nurses in Great Britain formed the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy

8. Andrew Taylor Still, MD, DO (August 6, 1828 – December 12, 1917) was the founder of osteopathy and osteopathic medicine in 1874. He was also a physician and surgeon, author, inventor and Kansas territorial and state legislator.

9. OMT is typically used to treat musculoskeletal disorders, such as low back pain, neck pain, pelvic pain, sports injuries, repetitive stress injuries, and tension headaches. While osteopathic and chiropractic techniques overlap, they are not identical. As a general rule, chiropractic manipulation uses direct thrust techniques on the spine (HVLA), while osteopathic practitioners use other, gentler techniques, as well as HVLA.

Summary:

All three professions now have a similar medical training but differ in professional   training and emphasis during treatment.

Physiotherapists tend to focus on exercises, chiropractors tend to focus on manipulation of the spine and osteopaths tend to utilise exercise, manipulation and soft tissue massage as part of an integrated approach).




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